Afterlife: How I See It

In October, a dozen UUFE members and friends met each week after the Sunday service for our “I Believe…” discussion group led by Amanda Schaller.  This is how Gayle Scroggs, UUFE’s Adult Enrichment Leader, described the class objective:

How do you respond when someone asks you this: “So you are a UU.  What do you believe?”

Is your UU elevator speech fuzzy?  Limited to what you have rejected?   Clarify and articulate your spiritual beliefs in this four-week interactive class.  

Last Sunday, to help articulate our spiritual beliefs, we grabbed crayons and drew pictures of our vision of the Afterlife.  Then we took a few minutes to describe our art.

Here are some of our Afterlifes:

 

 

GayleAfter Gayle

Life after me is not about me.  The sun will keep shining, rivers will keep flowing, living creatures will keep growing.  My one life is now–and living one well is challenge enough.  When I am no longer, kindly bury my remains in a forest as a token of appreciation. Let the tiny marker read thus:  “Thank you, Life.” – Gayle, 1950-20??.

– Gayle Scroggs

 

DonAlready Living in the Afterlife

We live in time and space that is mostly darkness with a few scattered points of light that are unimaginably far from one another.  When I draw the darkness or try to talk about it or think about it, I try not to be negative.  The darkness itself is not negative.  I find it easiest to quote others:  Gayle said in class, “It’s not about Gayle.”  Larry said, “We don’t have a common language” – to describe life, I would say.  One teacher wrote:  ““I discovered that it is necessary, absolutely necessary, to believe in nothing. That is, we have to believe in something which has no form and no color–something which exists before all forms and colors appear.”

– Don Barker

 

Sheryl downsizedMagnificent Light

After our bodies die we have endless opportunities to be drawn into the magnificent light that emanates always with love inviting us in.

 

– Sheryl Southwick

One response to “Afterlife: How I See It

  1. For me life is what happens between birth and death. When I have expired, Anatomy Gifts Registry will take given my body for research and training and cremate the rest. If my chooses to receive the ashes, I don’t want the decision of what to do with them to be burdensome. Flush them for all I care. The only way I think of living on is in the effects I have had on the world while I am here. Hopefully, the effects are mostly positive. The thoughts of the negative effects are my version of hell.

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